Coming Up! The Shiny Diamonds in Studio, The Pains of Being Pure at Heart Show, Guide to Music for Party People?

July 24, 2009 § 1 Comment

I’m having a busy next few days. Today I went out to shoot The Shiny Diamonds‘ music video, which is a bit funny in that it’s for the last album, meanwhile, they’re going into the studio to record demos for the next album. One can expect awesomeness, provided I don’t fuck up the filming. I’m not an expert pro–but don’t tell them that. Actually, a short tangent here: after feeling for a few years like the arts (be it music, literature, fine arts ect.) is all about how well one can bullshit, I’ve sort of resolved to try my best to be genuine in that respect and see what happens without making up any bullshit intentionally. I’m sure it’ll come out once in awhile, because part of human defense is to build oneself up when feeling the most vulnerable, or conversely, self-deprecation also seems to deflect attacks simply because everyone is her own best critic. Anyway, if what I do sucks, they can’t complain because I’m too stupid to charge them anything for making the video.

Either they're clapping or becoming greedy. Stay tuned for the video to find out.

Perhaps they're clapping, or becoming greedy like all those who rub their hands together, or maybe they're cold and trying to keep warm. Stay tuned for the video soon to find out!

The band also asked me to record some backing vocals on one of the songs “The Company Doesn’t Care”, I believe is the title. A female being recorded with the band apparently is momentous as The Shiny Ds are a bit of “boys’ club” states Tim rather proudly–he is after all a misogynist who reads Bitch. So I hope I’ve done you proud, kids. I’m about to rifle through the 2 hours worth of material and I think some of it may be posted later on as a part of the “Making Of” document.

In other news, Friday–today technically–I’m going to be seeing The Pains of Being Pure at Heart play, which surely promises to be a good show. I’m not sure who the opening band is, and what’s too bad is The Depreciation Guild, whom I’ve touted in a few recent posts, won’t be opening for The Pains of Being Pure at Heart until September and then they won’t be playing here at all. So, I guess I’ll have to be surprised tomorrow, but I’m excited nonetheless; seeing “Come Saturday” live is on my can’t-hardy-wait list and has incidentally, been released as a new single on green vinyl. Show review to follow soon.

And still further news, Saturday there’s a party a bunch of fellow art students are having, should be good–haven’t seen the lot since early April. Hopefully, the music selection is good. One of the biggest mistakes a person can make when hosting a party is to play downer music. In some places of the world (the U.K.) you can get away with playing “This Charming Man” by The Smiths, because everyone there knows the song and it’s upbeat and absurd, and everyone will sing along, but that’s as depressing as you’re allowed to get at a party. Could you imagine how terrible a party could get by blasting a bunch of the most depressing music you might’ve listened to on your own? Nobody would dance. Everyone would fall into their cups. Unfortunately though, one can’t just stick to upbeat, one needs to also include familiar songs to quell the confusion, which can be difficult if you absolutely hate most of the songs that would cater to the casual-listener audience, of which there is always some at every party. In other words, I’m glad, it’s not up to me to control the music playlist at this party. I’d probably just be an asshole and put on Tom Jones and dance alone.

Basic Tips on Your Party Mix

Cater to your audience! This is a big one: if you love hair metal then your friends into hip-hop probably won’t be thrilled, because though you might try, you cannot change someone’s musical taste that easily.

Mix it up! Don’t put a bunch of music by the same band on there and don’t put everything from the same genre, unless that’s the theme of the night (I’d love a disco night). Unless you’re throwing a rave, make sure you have some tempo variations between songs–slow it down, kick it up–otherwise it’ll become a mindless drone.

Songs we can all sing along to! Again, people love familiarity and when everyone busts out into song, it gives a sense of community and togetherness. These songs are best left until later in the playlist, once everyone is good and drunk and loosened up. It makes the night more memorable, and climaxes at the right moment.

New and nostalgia together at last! Related to mixing it up, be sure to include old and new tunes because everyone likes it when Run DMC starts pumping through the stereo after we just rocked out to the latest Franz Ferdinand/popular upbeat rock band.

Predict the night’s events and plan accordingly! You wouldn’t want the latest house remix oozing at 130BPM, while everyone is stoned out of their heads wishing for Led Zepplin, so try to guess what’s going to be appropriate at that juncture of the party in the playlist. In other words, near the end when everyone is conking out, don’t start playing the really fast stuff and don’t put people to sleep at the beginning either.

No Downers! As previously stated, if you want a bunch of happy people, play upbeat music and if you want a bunch of depressed friends, play depressing music.

 

Stay Gold.

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